Infection Control and Hygiene Blog

Please scroll down to find other interesting blog posts by OUTFOX Prevention.  You can also search topics on our site by using the search bar at the top right of this page.  See the Hygiene and Infection Control Blog (Click Here) Index for past posts.







Understanding and Preventing Hospital Acquired Infections – Infographic

posted Jan 18, 2016, 9:42 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Jan 18, 2016, 9:44 AM ]

Please enjoy this infographic to help understand and prevent HAI's (Hospital Acquired Infections). 


Infographic brought to you by Cleaning Services Group of UK

Germ Songs to teach hand washing and infection control

posted Jan 8, 2016, 10:16 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Jan 8, 2016, 10:19 AM ]



This is song list 2 of 3 for hand washing rhymes. Songs about germs can help engage children to wash their hands better. Fun activities will often lead to a higher retention of the concepts, which is a great start to habits. Classrooms are areas that harbor germs and viruses. As a teacher, you need to be constantly reminding just to keep most the class healthy. 

Cold and flu season can hit schools hard. If your students aren't up to date with hygiene habits (hand washing, coughing, sneezing, staying home when sick, etc.) then you could have a real issue on your hands within a few days.

We try to give activity ideas that can be used in most classrooms. We also promote the usage of Glo Germ. Glo Germ comes in gel, powder, or mist form to simulate all the ways that germs can spread. You simply apply the germs and let the students see them under a black light. You can test handwashing with Glo Germ or show how a cough can travel. 

Hope you survive the sick season!

One, Two, Rinse Off the Germs

Tune:  One, Two, Buckle My Shoe

Lyrics:

One, Two, rinse off the germs 
Three, Four, add some soap 
Five, Six, scrub again 
Seven, Eight, wash away 
Nine, Ten, clean again!

Actions:  Kids can rub their hands together while singing the song


Eency Weency Viruses

Tune:  Eency Weency Spider

Lyrics:

Eency weency viruses took over my hands again!
I walked to the sink and washed it down the drain
Now each time a germ gets on my hand
I scrub it off with soap and rinse the germ away!

Actions:  Kids can do the actions for the following words:

Hand – Point one finger in the middle of the opposite hand

Away – Throw both hands high in the air


 




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Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Understanding and Preventing Hospital Acquired Infections – Infographic Please enjoy this infographic to help understand and prevent HAI's (Hospital Acquired Infections). Infographic brought to you by Cleaning Services Group of UK
    Posted Jan 18, 2016, 9:44 AM by Todd Fox
  • Germ Songs to teach hand washing and infection control This is song list 2 of 3 for hand washing rhymes. Songs about germs can help engage children to wash their hands better. Fun activities will often lead to a ...
    Posted Jan 8, 2016, 10:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 176. View more »

Glo Germ Christmas Holiday Infection Control Lesson

posted Nov 9, 2015, 7:29 PM by Todd Fox   [ updated Nov 9, 2015, 7:32 PM ]


Use Glo Germ to teach a great infection control lesson during the Christmas and Thanksgiving holiday seasons.

 Glo Germ Health Lesson

Glo Germ Lesson: All I Want For Christmas

All I Want For Christmas


 

Content Objective:

The students will be able to practice effective hygiene principles in preparation for the holiday break in order to reduce the amount of illnesses brought back to school.  The optional 3 week span will help build good habits.  Also, the students will understand the good (Nice) and bad (Naughty) nature of germs. 

Materials:

Glo Germ Kit, colored paper, scissors, glue, markers, glitter, educational and promotional posters, prizes (i.e. pencils, magnets, etc.), Certificates of Achievement, and any other design materials.

Vocabulary

  • Habit
  • Hygiene Principle
  • Mores

Building Background Knowledge:

Ask students the following questions:

  • How long does it take to build a habit?
    • The average time to build a habit is three weeks.
  • Why is it important to form a habit of practicing good hygiene principles at school, home, or in public?
    • It is a very responsible thing to do in order to not get sick often and also to not spread illnesses to other people.

Exploration:

 

  • Discuss with the students which hygiene principles would be easy to follow/practice as a class for the 3-4 week period leading up to the holiday break.  Decide on at least three habits to track.
  • Use the Glo Germ to illustrate how germs spread and affect us daily.
    • Have students apply the Glo Germ Gel or Powder.  Make sure they get it all over their hands (i.e. doorknobs, sinks, pencils, or other designated area)
    • Using the black light, show students how germs lurk on their hands
    • Have them wash their hands and check for the germs again
    • Use the Identifier Lotion or Powder for many of the activities and games supplied by OUTFOX in this manual

Explanation:

 

You must prepare the students for habit building exercises (training, tracking method, follow up, incentives, etc.).  Discussing that the lesson will extend past the current activity (recommended to last at least three weeks before the holiday break) is imperative for the students to adjust their mindsets.  The planned activity for this lesson is for the students to create their own germ and “Holiday Hygiene Chain.”

A proper introduction to the lesson includes using the Glo Germ training kit and the related tools.  Explain how germs seem to get the best of us during the colder times of the season.  The fluorescent simulation germs of GloGerm create a “gross out” out factor that will get the students’ minds focused on increasing their hygiene standards. 

As part of the lesson, introduce how there are good germs and bad germs (i.e. Naughty and Nice germs).  Explain that we need to work hard to keep Naughty germs off our hands by washing them often (before class, before and after recess and lunch, and whenever they are visibly dirty, etc.). 

The students should then be introduced to the “Holiday Hygiene Chain.” Discuss that each day, every student can cut a link from their chain after washing their hands (you specify the time for these daily hand washings- most teachers schedule the hand washing before lunch). 

The chain will get smaller the closer the holiday break comes.  By the time the holiday arrives, the students should have a habit of washing their hands well before a meal or whenever you schedule the hand washing session.

To create initial excitement for the germ creation and chain building, explain that there will be a prize for the best looking Naughty and Nice germ (or other type of contest you choose). 

Give Certificates of Achievement to all students.  Hand out prizes to the winners of the designated contest or as you see fit.

“Hands On Experience:”

 

  • Have the students draw, color, and cut out their germ they create.  The germ they create serves as the top piece where the chain will attach. 
  • Have the students create a linked chain from colored paper (color of their choice).  Determine the amount of days from the training until the holiday break (or other day). 
  • Paste or tape the chain to the germ.
  • Hang the Holiday Hygiene Chains on the wall where they can be accessed by the children.
  • Each day, the students can cut a link from the chain after washing their hands.  Multiple hand washings in the day can make up for days that the student was absent.

Wrap Up:

 

  • Take note of the attitude changes of the students as the time goes by.  Do they remember to wash their hands?  Are they eager to get another link cut off?  Are they washing their hands more often in other situations in result of the habit forming exercise?  Are the students beginning to police themselves because of the enlightened hygiene standards?

Home Connection:

 

  • Have the students create and start their own Holiday Hygiene Chain at home with family and friends.  Send a note home that explains the chain and how the student can cut a link when they wash their hands at home (one a day).
  • Send the students’ created germs and any remaining links home with them when the holiday break begins.






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Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Understanding and Preventing Hospital Acquired Infections – Infographic Please enjoy this infographic to help understand and prevent HAI's (Hospital Acquired Infections). Infographic brought to you by Cleaning Services Group of UK
    Posted Jan 18, 2016, 9:44 AM by Todd Fox
  • Germ Songs to teach hand washing and infection control This is song list 2 of 3 for hand washing rhymes. Songs about germs can help engage children to wash their hands better. Fun activities will often lead to a ...
    Posted Jan 8, 2016, 10:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 176. View more »





Preparation for a Glo Germ lesson

posted Oct 11, 2015, 10:39 PM by Todd Fox   [ updated Oct 11, 2015, 10:49 PM ]

Steps to follow for an effective infection control lesson


Preparation for Your Training 


  1. If you purchased the Glo Germ system, review all of the materials in the package you have purchased. Please read all of the suggestions and warnings to avoid any unwanted result. 
  2. Write out an outline of how your training will proceed that will be optimal for your audience. See the subsection “Conducting Health Assessments” to help prepare for your training (previous blog post). Make sure to properly introduce the training to get the maximum results. An outline might contain the following sections: 
    1. Introduction (explain the hygiene issue and related statistics) 
    2. Activity explanation (explain the glow in the dark element and how it ties into unseen germs) 
    3. Perform the activity (show where you planted the invisible/semi-invisible Glo Germ gel/powder with a black light or have the audience apply lotion/powder) 
    4. Post activity explanation (explain how germs stick around despite our efforts to remove them). 
    5. Recognition (point out good examples of those audience members that were able to clean the best). 
    6. Conclusion (tie in the training to your organization and its goals) 
  3. If applicable (according to training suggestions below), plant some Glo Germ powder before any member of your audience enters the room. 

Quick Training Instructions: 
  1. Preface the trainings and what the audience will experience. 
  2. Apply Glo Germ lotion, powder, mist, or spray OR reveal that you have applied the materials to counters, students, papers, etc. 
  3. Use the black light to show the effect of germ spreading. 
  4. Have participating (effective if all have Glo Germ (or Glitterbug) lotion/powder applied to hands) students wash hands and other affected areas. 
  5. Re-Check applied areas with the black light to emphasize hygiene. 
  6. Conclude with explanations and statistics.


Your Glo Germ training system

If you purchased Glo Germ, the packet in front of you will likely resemble what is shown in the featured picture here: Glo Germ. Package contents may differ depending on the package or training version purchased. If you have questions about any of the package contents after reading the Training Instructions please call or email us. For best results, use the Program, Game and Activity Ideas in this blog roll. A single training can be forgotten more easily than a well thought out program that uses many elements of teaching and learning.

Good luck!






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Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Understanding and Preventing Hospital Acquired Infections – Infographic Please enjoy this infographic to help understand and prevent HAI's (Hospital Acquired Infections). Infographic brought to you by Cleaning Services Group of UK
    Posted Jan 18, 2016, 9:44 AM by Todd Fox
  • Germ Songs to teach hand washing and infection control This is song list 2 of 3 for hand washing rhymes. Songs about germs can help engage children to wash their hands better. Fun activities will often lead to a ...
    Posted Jan 8, 2016, 10:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 176. View more »

The Definitive Child Road Safety Guide

posted Jul 27, 2015, 9:57 PM by Todd Fox   [ updated Jul 27, 2015, 10:02 PM ]

Knowing and applying these safe steps is considered as a significant contribution towards creating more vibrant and liveable communities and attaining safe and sustainable transport to the benefit of all who use the roads.


A Look at Child-related Road Accidents Worldwide

  • · Every 4 minutes, a child in some part of the world is involved in a road accident.­ 
  • · According to the World Health Organization: For children 15-17 years old, there is no greater threat to their lives than road traffic crashes. 
  • · Boys account for nearly twice as many road traffic deaths as girls worldwide. This increased risk for boys is thought to be due to greater exposure to traffic, as well as a tendency for boys to take more risks than girls. 
  • · 38% of children involved in road accidents are pedestrians in Low to Middle income countries. 
  • · 36% of children involved in road accidents are passengers in High income countries. 

Seven Strategies to Keep Kids Safe on the Road 

  1. Don’t exceed 20 mph or 30 kph in high-pedestrian traffic areas 
    1. Speed is the number 1 contributing factor in every road accident. That’s why speed must be limited and controlled on every high-pedestrian traffic area such as schools and residences. 
    2. Driving with a speed limit of up to 20 miles per hour or 30 kilometres per hour reduces the dangerous aspect of a car greatly. 
  2. Never drink and drive 
    1. Going beyond 0.05g/dl BAC (blood alcohol concentration) increases the risk of road-related accidents by 2500% or 25x. 
    2. UAE enforces a strict rule when it comes to drinking alcohol. So don’t even drink a sip if you’re going to drive.
  3. Wear helmets 
    1. For cyclists, this is the single most effective strategy to reduce the risk of head injuries that are mostly fatal in nature. 
    2. A helmet can reduce the risk of head injury by as much as 69%--decreasing death risk by as much as 40%. 
  4. Wear restraints in vehicles 
    1. Aside from wearing a seat belt, putting children on restraints while riding a vehicle are estimated to reduce significant injuries by 59%, fatalities by 70% on infants, and between 54-80% on young children. 
    2. Restraints include specialised and age-appropriate car seats and booster seats. 
  5. Improve visibility 
    1. Wearing light coloured clothing and using reflective materials on articles such as backpacks and vests are effective ways to improve a child’s visibility on the road at any time. 
    2. For motorists, opening the vehicle’s lights is known to reduce traffic crashes by 29%. 
  6. Get trained or informed in providing appropriate care 
    1. Learning certain emergency care techniques and first aid will benefit the young children involved in a road scuffle. Because of their age, the young have an extraordinary capacity for recovery.
  7. Educate both children and motorists 
    1. Being actively involved in teaching children and motorists alike in the discipline of safe driving and exercising judgment on the road prove invaluable to every person in lessening life-threatening risks. 
    2. Sharing the importance of adhering to laws and regulations, teaching proper road ethics and etiquette and educating about the meaning of road signs will help reduce the probability of a child being involved in a road accident. Road safety is everyone’s responsibility. 

About the Author:

Born and raised in the Philippines, Joanna has been living in Dubai with her family for the past 10 years. Her journey to parenthood inspired her in spearheading Afterschool.ae, the best parent's planning platform for after school kids activities in UAE.

Glo Germ for Food Processing Organizations

posted Jun 1, 2015, 2:02 PM by Todd Fox   [ updated Jun 1, 2015, 2:02 PM ]

Almost every week there are reports of people getting sick, getting checked into hospitals, and some evening dying over contaminated food.

Salmonella in spinach, contaminated cantaloupes, bad broccoli, and so forth. These contaminated food reports aren't even mentioning the bacteria that often comes from meat processing plants.

In reality, most food processing operations are constantly struggling with the potential of foodborne illness outbreaks.  It only takes one outbreak to shut down operations, ruin brands, and alter the quality of life for a consumer.

The only way to avert a foodborne illness outbreak is to have a thorough hygiene and infection control program.  The program needs to be instituted from executives to the janitorial staff. The avoidance of germs needs to be almost religious for all the employees. One employee's negligence can bring the whole system down.

Besides introducing rules, reminders and hype around the program, you need the right teaching tools.  The Glo Germ System is a tool that can get your organization on track and excited about infection control.

Glo Germ helps your staff members realize how germs spread and which operations are letting germ enter the food.  Hand hygiene and hand washing stations are musts to combat germs and reduce the spreading.  The fluorescent powder and gel tests handwashing through UV black light technology.  Simply use the blacklight to test how well the hands were washed.

The need to train on glove usage is very important as well.  Glove (and other personal protective equipment - PPE) usage is often misunderstood by many workers.  Gloves may may block the bacteria and other germs from the employees' hands (although studies show that germs can penetrate). However, the gloves are also conductors of germs as workers touch various places with germ covered gloves.  

Glo Germ shows the spread from the dirty glove usage (because workers rarely switch for new gloves between tasks). Also, glove removal is a cause of for germ spreading.  Employees often flip contaminated material during removal.  Glo Germ gels and powders are simulation germs that work to teach proper handling! 

Glo Germ can help your food workers and janitorial staff see how well they are cleaning up crucial areas. If the cleaning is not conducted correctly then there is no clean process or machinery that will combat an already contaminated area.  Glo Germ helps test the environmental cleaning processes.

If you need more ways to use Glo Germ in your food processing plant then please contact us.

Germ Activity: Fill in the blank game

posted May 26, 2015, 11:17 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated May 26, 2015, 11:19 AM ]

Use this fill-in game to create an health lesson for your class.


Need a fun and easy lesson for your class that will teach them hand washing? This game is one of them! Simply use this fill-in game to teach them how to best deal with germs. Handwashing is an important skill that all students must know how to properly do. 

If your students are spreading germs (common cold, the flu, pink eye, measles, mumps, chicken pox, and other illnesses) then the learning atmosphere suffers.

Simply copy this game text into a Word Doc and make copies for your students. Have them determine which health term fits in each of the marked spots. 

You can create a competition and also use a Glo Germ Kit to show them how germs spread (Glo Gel is simulation germ lotion that shines brightly under a UV black light).

Stop Spreading Germs!

Use the words in the box to complete this story about a day of being a germ!

tissue       sick            wash         small        soap         dirty         hands        germs        pencil

 

I am a germ! I love being a germ. I am too __________ for anyone to even see me! I like to hide in places where it is _____________. I am a pretty strong germ! When I get into a kid’s body, I can make that kid __________. One day, I got sneezed out by a sick kid who didn’t use a ____________ and then I got all over his ____________. Soon his friend used his pencil, and then forgot to _____________ his ____________ before eating lunch. I got to make him sick, too! I am scared of _____________ because it gets rid of lots of _____________ like me! 





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Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Understanding and Preventing Hospital Acquired Infections – Infographic Please enjoy this infographic to help understand and prevent HAI's (Hospital Acquired Infections). Infographic brought to you by Cleaning Services Group of UK
    Posted Jan 18, 2016, 9:44 AM by Todd Fox
  • Germ Songs to teach hand washing and infection control This is song list 2 of 3 for hand washing rhymes. Songs about germs can help engage children to wash their hands better. Fun activities will often lead to a ...
    Posted Jan 8, 2016, 10:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 176. View more »

Infection Control Training Instructions: Glo Germ ideas and processes

posted May 18, 2015, 9:17 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated May 18, 2015, 9:18 AM ]

Need to teach about germs? There isn't a better infection control training than Glo Germ. The following will walk you through step by step how to prepare and conduct a Glo Germ lesson. These instructions should help you answer all of your questions so your students will learn better.

The Training: Introduction


Make sure to properly introduce the Glo Germ training so that maximum participation can be realized by the audience. Questions are often very effective to get the audience engaged in the trainings. Use these points to help formulate your introduction approach: 

  1. Briefly explain to the audience about the visualization exercise they will soon witness (simulation germs with fluorescent powder or gel). 
  2. Ask the audience questions similar to: 
    1. How do illnesses spread?
    2. What is an epidemic? 
    3. Have you ever gotten sick after you have been near other sick people? 
    4. Do you think you wash your hands well enough? 
    5. Have you had any experiences where you have observed others not washing their hands? 
    6. What are some of the basic steps to staying healthy and not spreading illness? 

The Training: The Activity


The activity should be engaging and allow the audience to experiment with the Glo Germ simulation. The following suggestions are recommended for an effective training activity: 

  1. Remember, get creative because this training should be fun! 
  2. Explain that the fluorescent lotion or powder represents germs or other unclean particles.
  3. Explain that you did or will apply the lotion or powder to certain areas. 
  4. Turn off the lights 
  5. Turn on the black light 
  6. Wave the black light over the applied areas (i.e. counters, doorknobs, hands, or other areas where the audiences’ hands may have touched). 
  7. Explain how germs and other unclean particles are often invisible to the human eye, but they still exist (hence they show up under the black light). 
  8. Wash the applied areas or have students wash the applied areas (i.e. counters, doorknobs, hands, or other areas where students’ hands may have touched). 
  9. Show students that, although thorough cleaning attempts are made, germs and other unclean particles remain. 
  10. Mark the “Hand Washing Test” for each student so they know where to better clean their hands the next time their hands are dirty. 
  11. Instruct them on more thorough cleaning processes. For example, have them pay more attention to: 
    1. Going through a regular cleaning process 
    2. Spending more time washing hands and affected areas 
    3. Washing in and around cracks and crevices 
    4. Using more soap during cleaning 
    5. Etc. 

The Training: Conclusion


The conclusion on Glo Germ should sum up the information that was discussed in the introduction and apply what was learned during the activity. In addition, use this time to display evidence in order to back up what was seen during the germ simulation. Show examples and tell stories. The following steps will help give you ideas that will create a lasting impression in the minds of the audience. 

  1. Supplement the training with statistics on the amount of sick days your organization or the average organization uses in a year. What are the effects on business (operations, sales, profit, etc.) dealing with the number of absences? What is the effect of a child’s education if he/she often is absent? 
  2. Share stories that deal with illnesses. Stories dealing with preventable illnesses (preventable if the person(s) involved maintained a clean environment) are the most effective. 
  3. Relate how this training can be applied outside of the organization. Explain how the training can be taught to their friends and family at home. Many illness outbreaks stem from bad habits learned at home. These bad habits are often subsequently transferred to the work and school environments. 
  4. Set up a timetable for future hygiene goals. Help the students plan out when they will observe good hygiene principles. Use this blog to find other infection control games and activities.


Consider this case study:

  • Who: Mandy Olsen 
  • What: Pre-School Hygiene Training 
  • Where: Minneapolis, MN 
  • When: November 2010 
  • Why: Mandy runs a small daycare out her home and was concerned about the spread of illness and disease. She was also looking to bolster her risk management efforts and avoid the potential of claims/lawsuits. 
  • How: An Glo Germ kit was used (lotion, black light, etc.) to show students the invisible effects of not washing hands, not covering their mouths when they cough and sneeze, and leaving their environment unclean. The students found it fun and remember now to clean up more often. Parents have commented on how impressed they are of the new standards.





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OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Understanding and Preventing Hospital Acquired Infections – Infographic Please enjoy this infographic to help understand and prevent HAI's (Hospital Acquired Infections). Infographic brought to you by Cleaning Services Group of UK
    Posted Jan 18, 2016, 9:44 AM by Todd Fox
  • Germ Songs to teach hand washing and infection control This is song list 2 of 3 for hand washing rhymes. Songs about germs can help engage children to wash their hands better. Fun activities will often lead to a ...
    Posted Jan 8, 2016, 10:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 176. View more »


Standard Precaution poster giveaway

posted May 12, 2015, 9:11 PM by Todd Fox   [ updated May 19, 2015, 12:28 PM ]

We gave 2 sets of laminated Standard Precaution posters away. Congratulations to the current winners! Enter below for a chance to win the next time we have free items available.


Current Winners:

Maria Whitaker (Cortland Regional Medical Center)

Karen (Essex Specialized Surgical Institute)



Enter email here for the next drawing: 

*Includes 5 posters (Standard, Contact, Airborne, Droplet, and Respiratory). Only Continental US and Canada residents are eligible. Includes free shipping so all expenses are taken care of. Winners will be announced by email and on the entry form webpage.


If you don't want to wait, you can always get free PDF versions of the Standard Precautions.

Download now >


Good luck to the entrants. We also hope you take advantage of the free Standard Precaution poster PDFs if you do not win. Feel free to forward this page to others that could use these resources.


Links of interest:

Contact Precaution poster PDF

Droplet Precaution poster PDF

Airborne Precaution poster PDF

Respiratory Etiquette Precaution poster PDF

Standard Precaution poster PDF

Glo Germ Kit (free shipping)



Germ Songs for Hand Washing Lessons

posted May 11, 2015, 8:50 PM by Todd Fox   [ updated May 11, 2015, 8:53 PM ]


Part 1 of 2
Germ songs are written to the tunes of familiar tunes

Washing My Hands is Fun to Do

Tune:  Fun to Do

Lyrics:

Washing my hands is fun to do 
Fun to do 
To do to do 
Washing my hands is fun to do 
To do to do to do

Actions:  Kids can rub their hands together while singing the song


Do You Know the Germ Man?

Tune:  Do You Know the Muffin Man?

Lyrics:

I need to wash my hands
To wash my hands
To wash my hands
I need to wash my hands
So I don’t get sick!

Actions:  Kids can rub their hands together while singing the song


Wash Your Hands

Tune:  Pat-A-Cake

Lyrics:

Wash your hands, wash your hands, every day
After I eat, after I play
Rinse them, lather, and scrub the germs away
So you won’t get sick and can run and play!

Actions:  Kids can rub their hands together while singing the song


I Love to Wash My Hands

Tune:  Mary had a Little Lamb

Lyrics:

I Love to wash my hands
Wash my hands
Wash my hands
I love to wash my hands
So, I don’t get sick!

Actions:  Kids can rub their hands together while singing the song

We recommend using a Glo Germ Kit to help teach hand hygiene in conjunction with these songs. The more you can create a fun learning environment, the longer your students will remember to wash their hands.

Clean hands makes for clean and healthy classrooms! Teach them now and maybe they'll practice good hygiene over their summer break.





Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Understanding and Preventing Hospital Acquired Infections – Infographic Please enjoy this infographic to help understand and prevent HAI's (Hospital Acquired Infections). Infographic brought to you by Cleaning Services Group of UK
    Posted Jan 18, 2016, 9:44 AM by Todd Fox
  • Germ Songs to teach hand washing and infection control This is song list 2 of 3 for hand washing rhymes. Songs about germs can help engage children to wash their hands better. Fun activities will often lead to a ...
    Posted Jan 8, 2016, 10:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 176. View more »

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