Infection Control and Hygiene Blog

Please scroll down to find other interesting blog posts by OUTFOX Prevention.  You can also search topics on our site by using the search bar at the top right of this page.  See the Hygiene and Infection Control Blog (Click Here) Index for past posts.







Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections

posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:11 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 10, 2014, 8:12 AM ]


Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital acquired infections (HAIs).

In Canada, where approximately 220,000 Canadians (or approximately 0.6% of the population) are infected with an HAI annually, a new survey revealed that a startling number (38%) of hospital infection control experts believe their hospitals are not clean enough to prevent the spread of infectious organisms like C. difficile. The survey was conducted in late 2012 and early 2013, and comprised the infection control experts of 113 hospitals across Canada.

C. difficile, the bacteria and spores of which are found in feces, can be picked up by coming into contact with contaminated surfaces, objects, or other people, and is potentially fatal. It accounts for more than half of the offending infections in Canadian hospitals, and the death rate from C. difficile has tripled in Canada over the past 15 years.

As hygiene of hospital staff is paramount to preventing the spread of the bacteria to patients, hand-washing campaigns have been initiated that have been successful in improving the rate of hand hygiene amongst Canadian health care practitioners from a lowly 30% into the 80-90% range.

U.S Numbers Just as Bleak

In the U.S, the numbers are just as stark. Approximately 4% of patients pick up a HAI during their hospital stays according to the CDC, which is up from their previous estimates. 200 of those infected patients will end up dying from their infection annually, while 75,000 patients will die in U.S hospitals annually with a HAI (without it being the primary cause of death).

Pneumonia accounted for the most common infection type, along with surgical site infections, with 157,500 of each case. C. difficile was the most common bacteria leading to infections. Other bacteria included Klebsiella, E. coli, Enterococcus, andPseudomonasThe former two, part of the Enterobacteriaceae family of bacteria, are becoming resistant to last-resort antibiotics according to the CDC.

Antibiotic Overuse Partially to Blame for Infections?

One prominent characteristic of C. difficile is that an infection is more likely to take control when a patient is on antibiotics. As antibiotics alter (and often temporarily destroy) the gut bacteria of those taking them, it allows C. difficile to take root in the gut and flourish. It’s not surprising then that the Public Health Agency of Canada recommends not only diligent hand-washing and hygiene, but also careful use of antibiotics to limit the number of patients that could be threatened by C. difficile.

As the CDC reported in early March, antibiotic overuse is not only putting patients at risk of contracting infections like C. difficile, it’s also leading to less and less effectiveness from the drugs themselves, and further fuelling the creation of drug resistant superbugs.

What Patients Can Do to Help

Hygiene amongst patients is just as important as for the medical professionals themselves, and patients should avoid touching objects and surfaces in their rooms and around the hospital as much as possible, while keeping their hands clean whenever they can. Patients should be as proactive regarding their health and well-being as they can be, factoring in their given condition at the time.

Patients are also encouraged to ask their doctors or nurses if they’ve washed their hands, with some U.S hospitals posting signs saying “It’s OK to ask”. Whether their stay is at a hospital, a long term care facility, an intensive care unit, or a rehab center, patients need to have complete faith in their health care provider, as they are often  putting their lives in their hands. Hand hygiene is particularly important in the ICU, where patients have weakened and vulnerable immune systems that are susceptible to infection. In long term care facilities and rehab centers for addiction and physical rehabilitation where patients are often staying for extended periods of time, added emphasis needs to be placed on cleaning and disinfecting one's sleeping quarters to remove bacteria, allowing those patients to focus on their recovery with confidence.

"It's Ok to Ask"

A study conducted in Canada last summer also showed that doctors were more cognizant of washing their hands when they knew patients were watching them, which could give hospitals incentive to make hand-washing stations more readily available in patient rooms.

Other advancements are also being worked on that could further improve hand hygiene among health care workers. One promising field is wearable tech, with devices that could be used to alert practitioners to when they should be washing their hands and how well they've done so. Hyginex, a company in the hand hygiene technology field recently received an investment from Persistent Systems to help them launch their devices, which would monitor hand rub duration and frequency, among other factors.



Infection Control Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital ...
    Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:12 AM by Todd Fox
  • Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested Learn where we need to have the best hygieneUse this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust ...
    Posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 154. View more »

Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested

posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:16 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 4, 2014, 8:19 AM ]

Learn where we need to have the best hygiene
Use this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust the concepts and principles to have it apply to older students, nurses, healthcare workers, restaurant employees and others that work in areas with health issues (germ spreading, bacteria, foodborne illnesses, etc.). 


This lesson is typically conducted in conjunction with other infection control lessons throughout the National Public Health Week.  Contact us if you would like other ways to celebrate health week or to teach about microbes and preventing infection.  

Make sure to download the free worksheets so that your students can have a productive activity to go along with the health lesson.

We hope that health week goes well for you and that your students or employees learn better health habits!

Glo Germ Health Week


Glo Germ Day 5

Where Are Germs at Home and on My Body?


 

Content Objective:

Students will be able to recognize places where germs may hide at home and be able to teach their families the importance of hand-washing.

Materials:

Germ Journal “Germs At Home Too?” page (PDF attached), Pictures of home places (sinks, counter tops, toilets, etc.), Glo Germ Kit (fluorescent lotion and UV black light)

Vocabulary:

·       Sanitation

Building Background Knowledge:

Ask students the following questions:

  • We’ve learned a lot about germs in school, but where are places that germs can hide at your home?
  • Where else can germs hide on your body?

Exploration:

 

  • Have students review places that germs can hide in the classroom. Write a list on the chalkboard or whiteboard.
  • Remind students that germs like to hide in places that are dirty and that people touch a lot.
  • Show students pictures of places around the home. Ask them why germs could be hiding there. (they are dirty and get touched a lot)
  • Use the Glo Germ system to teach hand washing.  The fluorescent lotion is applied, checked with the black light, the student washes their hands, and the hands are again checked with the UV blacklight.

Explanation:

 

  • Remind students that there are other places on their bodies that germs can hide.  Germs called “plaque” can live in your teeth and make holes in your teeth. Germs called “lice” can live in your hair. Different germs can live in all different parts of their bodies.
  • Explain to students that they need to keep all parts of their body clean. They don’t need to wash their bodies as much as they wash their hands, but they need to keep all parts of their bodies clean.
  • Ask students when they need to wash their hands. (after using the restroom, after coughing or sneezing, before eating, etc.)
  • Ask students when they need to brush their teeth. (2 times a day or after eating)
  • Ask students when they need to wash their bodies. (every day or after they go somewhere with lots of germs.)

“Hands On Experience”:

 

  • Finish the last 2 pages together with your class comparing and contrasting where germs are at home and school. The center section should have listed things such as doorknobs, sinks, bathrooms and so forth. Germs at School should have things that students touch at school like pencils, drinking fountains, etc. Germs at Home should have things like TV remotes, utensils, etc.

Wrap Up:

  • Remind students that germs are everywhere and they need to be in charge of getting germs off of them!

Home Connection:

  • Ask students to share with their parents what they learned about germs.

 

 

 



Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital ...
    Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:12 AM by Todd Fox
  • Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested Learn where we need to have the best hygieneUse this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust ...
    Posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 154. View more »

Health Week Lesson Plan Day 4: Germ Spreading

posted Apr 3, 2014, 10:00 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 3, 2014, 10:06 AM ]

Learn how germs spread
Use this infection control lesson to teach how germs spread in schools,hospitals and food services. Follow up this lesson with a hand washing activity, hygiene game or other health activity.

Use the worksheet attached to add to your students' germ journals.

The worksheet is a fill-in-the-blank lesson plan that the students can work on to gain better health habits.  It talks about using tissues, washing hands, using soap and water, and where germs can hide to make us sick.

This infection control lesson is a great addition to your plans for National Public Health Week that is held each year on the first full week of April.  See NPHW.org for more information.

Glo Germ Lesson Plans


Glo Germ Day 4: Health Week

How Do Germs Spread?


 

Content Objective:

Students will be able to understand and explain how germs spread from one place to another.

Materials:

Shaving Cream, a copy of Miss Bindergarten Stays Home from Kindergarten, Glo Germ  (optional), Germ Journal “Stop Spreading Germs!” page (PDF attached)

Vocabulary:

·       Antibacterial

Building Background Knowledge:

Ask students the following questions:

·       Where do germs hide?

·       How do you think germs go from one place to another?

Exploration:

 

·       Read the book Miss Bindergarten Stays Home from Kindergarten and ask students what happened when one student got sick. (All the other kids, the teacher and the student get sick)

·       Ask one student to be your “Sick Student” for the day. Explain to students that when we get sick, our germs can come out when we cough, sneeze, or blow our nose.

·       Squirt some shaving cream (or Glo Germ Gel or powder) onto the hands of the “Sick Student” and show students that the shaving cream represents the germs that get on your hands when you sneeze your sickness germs on your hands instead of a tissue.

·       Ask your “Sick Student” to do a few classroom things like sharpen a pencil, get a drink, or use a crayon. (Make sure you have the student touch things that can easily be wiped off!)

·       Show your students how the germs on his hands got on all of the things the “Sick Student” touched.  Turn the lights off and the black light on if you used the Glo Germ lotion or powder.

Explanation:

 

·       Ask students to think of all the things they touch in the classroom. Make a list on the board of those things. (pencils, markers, door handles, centers, books, etc.)

·       Ask students how they think they can keep germs from getting on their hands or how to get them off their hands when they forget. (using tissues, hand sanitizer, and washing hands)

“Hands On Experience”:

·       Find the “Stop Spreading Germs” page in the Germ Journal.

·       Finish the story about the germs page together.

Wrap Up:

 

·       Show students where in the classroom they can find tissues, soap and hand sanitizer. Ask them to help remind everyone to keep germs out of the classroom.

Home Connection:

·       Ask students to share with their parents what they learned about germs.



Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital ...
    Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:12 AM by Todd Fox
  • Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested Learn where we need to have the best hygieneUse this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust ...
    Posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 154. View more »

Health Week Lesson Plan Day 3: Germ Hiding Places

posted Apr 2, 2014, 8:06 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 3, 2014, 10:07 AM ]

Learn where germs hide out often
Teach your students where the common places that germs hang out (door handles, restrooms, hospitals, schools, restaurants, etc.) so that they can learn to avoid them for better health. Use this lesson plan and worksheet for National Public Health Week (NPHW.org).

Glo Germ Lesson Plans

Glo Germ Day 3: Health Week

Where are germs hiding?

 

 

Content Objective:

Students will be able to identify places that germs live and understand how to avoid them.

Materials:

Pictures of places germs hide (dirty backpacks, unwashed food, playground equipment, etc.), Germ Journal  “Where Are Germs?” page, Posters and other reminders, Glo Germ Kit (Optional)

Vocabulary:

  • Outbreak
  • Review “Germs”

Building Background Knowledge:

Ask students the following questions:

  • What are Germs?
  • Where do you think germs hide?
  • How do germs get in these places?
  • How do germs make us sick?

Exploration:

 

  • Quickly show students or hang up the pictures. Ask students what all of them are and what makes them the same or different. Tell them that these are all places germs can hide.
  • Remind students that germs are so tiny you can’t see them. Germs also need to get into your body to make you sick through your mouth or nose, or cuts, like in the Magic School Bus book.
  • Tell students that germs like to live in places that are dirty.
  • Use a Glo Germ Kit to show how germs and microbes spread.

Explanation:

 

  • Show students the pictures again and ask how they think germs get there. Also ask them how those germs can get into their bodies. (unwashed hands, cuts)
  • Remind students that germs have to get into your body to make you sick, so just touching these things won’t make you sick unless you forget to wash your hands before you eat or wipe your nose or somehow get them in your body.

“Hands On Experience:”

 

  • Find the “Where are Germs” page in the Germ Journal.
  • Ask students to draw pictures of 3 places where germs can hide in the classroom, in their homes, and outside.

Wrap Up:

  • Ask students what places they thought of where germs can hide.

Home Connection:

  • Ask students to share with their parents what they learned about germs.
  • Take home Germ Journal page.



Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital ...
    Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:12 AM by Todd Fox
  • Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested Learn where we need to have the best hygieneUse this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust ...
    Posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 154. View more »

Health Week Lesson Plan Day 2: Germs

posted Apr 1, 2014, 7:57 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 3, 2014, 10:09 AM ]

Learn about germs
The following lesson is day 2 of the National Public Health Week (NPHW) lesson plans available to teach your students about microbes and germs. Have your students draw a germ that will remind them to wash their hands to stay healthy!

Glo Germ Health Lesson Plans 

Glo Germ Day 2: Health Week

What are Germs?


 

Content Objective:

Students will be able to explain what a germ is and make a physical representation of a germ.

Materials:

Pictures of “germs” (bacteria, viruses, etc.), Germ Journal “My Germ” page, a copy of The Magic School Bus: Inside Ralphie, Glo Germ Kit

Vocabulary

  • Germ
  • Microscope

Building Background Knowledge:

  • Ask students the following questions:
  • What are Germs?
  • How big are germs? (Ask them to guess comparing them to classroom objects: are they as big as a paper clip?, etc.)
  • How can washing our hands get rid of germs? (it gets rid of them)

Exploration:


  • Read the story Magic School Bus: Inside Ralphie and ask students about Ralphie’s germs. How did he get sick? How did the bus-germ get inside Ralphie?
  • How can we get germs? (From dirty hands, cuts or scrapes)
  • Show students a few pictures of germs and ask what they think they are.
  • Explain that germs are not animals, and not plants, but little bugs that can make us sick.
  • Explain that germs are so tiny that they can’t be seen without special tools called Microscopes and the pictures we’re seeing are pictures through a microscope. (Use GloGerm Kit to show the simulation germs under the UV black light) 

Explanation:


  • Tell students that different kinds of germs are what make us sick. Ask them what they feel like when they get sick. Those ill/sick feelings are from germs!
  • Explain to students that there are a lot of different kinds of germs. Some are shaped like circles, some look fuzzy, some look like little bugs.
  • Tell them that different kinds of germs make different kinds of sicknesses. Some germs make you cough, some make you sick to your stomach, give you a runny nose, etc.

“Hands On Experience:”


  • List on the board some adjectives that describe germs
  • Find the “My Germ” page in the Germ journal.
  • Tell students that they are going to make their own “Super Germ!” On the “Germs” page, explain to students that they need to pretend that they are looking at their germ through a microscope. They need to draw what it looks like.
  • Also on the germs page, have them fill in the description box with words about their germ.
  • Have them fill out the Sickness box with what kinds of sicknesses it would give someone. (Nothing gross!)

Wrap Up:

  • Have students share with each other or with the class what their germs look like.

Home Connection:

  • Ask students to share with their parents what they learned about germs.

 

 

 



Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital ...
    Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:12 AM by Todd Fox
  • Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested Learn where we need to have the best hygieneUse this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust ...
    Posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 154. View more »

Health Week Lesson Plan Day 1: Hand Washing

posted Mar 31, 2014, 8:38 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Mar 31, 2014, 8:40 AM ]

Learn the basics of hand washing
Health week is near! Next week you should have some health lessons to help celebrate National Public Health Week (www.NPHW.com).  Use the Glo Germ System and the attached PDF to teach a great lesson on handwashing.  

Glo Germ Health Week Lesson Plans

Glo Germ Day 1: Health Week

Hand Washing!


 

Content Objective:

Students will be able to understand the importance of hand washing and be able to discuss the procedures for correct hand washing.  The students will build their “Germ Journal” with each day’s activity

Materials:

Germ Journal Cover Sheet, Germ Journal “Hand Washing” page, Glo Germ Kit (UV Light (black light), Fluorescent Lotion)

Vocabulary

  • Hygiene
  • Virus
  • Illness
  • Flu

Building Background Knowledge:

Ask students the following questions:

  • When should you wash your hands? (after using the restroom, before eating, before touching food, after coughing, etc.)
  • Why is it important to wash your hands? (to keep them clean, to stop the spread of germs)
  • What supplies do you need when you wash your hands? (a sink, warm water, soap, and a towel)

Exploration:

 

  • Have students put on Fluorescent Gel. Make sure they get it all over their hands!
  • Using the black light, show students the germs that are lurking on their hands.
  • Point out where the germs are and have them draw and color in the germs on the “Pre Hand Washing” section of the hands on the “Hand Washing” worksheet.

Explanation:

 

  • Ask students what they think about the germs on their hands.
  • Remind them that germs can make them sick and that washing your hands can get rid of those germs.
  • Discuss with them the step-by-step process of hand washing while showing them the actions:
    • First, turn on warm water (not too hot!)
    • Next, add some soap to your hand
    • Then, scrub your hands together for 20 seconds. Make sure you get both sides!

o Finally, rinse off the soap and germs and dry with a clean towel.

·   Teach them the “Hand Washing Song” (Sung to Row, Row, Row your Boat)

o Start with warm water

o Then you add the soap.

o Scrub and scrub and wash and wash

o Rinse hands off and dry them.

·   Demonstrate hand washing. While you’re scrubbing, sing the song through twice to show them how long they need to wash their hands.

“Hands On Experience:”

 

  • Have each student wash their hands in a sink where you can help them with correct procedures.
  • Make sure students DO NOT TOUCH anything after washing hands in order to keep the germs off!
  • Have each student put their hands under the black light again.
  • Draw and color the germs on the “Post Hand Washing” section.

Wrap Up:

 

  • Have students look at the before and after hands on their worksheets.
  • Ask students whether they saw a difference and ask if their germs disappeared.
  • Discuss with students the importance of washing hands and why we need to make germs disappear.

Home Connection:

 

  • Have students take home the “Hand Washing Worksheet” and have a family discussion on washing hands.


Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital ...
    Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:12 AM by Todd Fox
  • Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested Learn where we need to have the best hygieneUse this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust ...
    Posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 154. View more »

New Glo Germ Kit: Classic Product Review

posted Mar 25, 2014, 7:50 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Mar 26, 2014, 1:19 PM ]


New Glo Germ Kit: Classic Product Review

Glo Germ is Not Just for Medical Organizations

Imagine that you are 20 years into your career, thinking you know it all about germs and infection. You have read the books, heard the lectures, tried new products and so forth. So, how do you keep infection control lessons interesting, informative and effective? Have you ever tried a Glo Germ Kit? If you answered yes, then I challenge you to get more creative and insert Glo Germ into other lessons, demonstrations and other trainings to give your audience a visual of germs and infection. You can even submit your ideas (Email your ideas, successes and questions to info@OUTFOXprevention.com)!

Despite popular opinion, the Glo Germ Kits are not just for the medical or healthcare field. The kits have proven to be very effective in schools, food services, clean manufacturing, dentistry, banking and many other industries. Business offices also use it to teach their employees about germs, hand washing and why they should not go to work sick!

Really, the Glo Germ Kits can be used in any organization and benefit the health knowledge of the staff. When the staff knows more about infection control, then the less business interruption will occur. Employees will stay healthy, customers will be protected, outbreaks won’t reek havoc for your PR, lawsuits will be avoided and you will get sick less often- all great things!

We have been reviewing Glo Germ Kit sizes so that you can have the pros and cons of each kit. We want to help you make the most informed decision for the size and type of organization. Previously we reviewed the Glo Germ Premium Mini Kit (See the Glo Germ Review here).

The Glo Germ Classic Kit is a kit that sets you up for lessons that can handle a large group or be used over a year. The capacity of the Glo Germ Classic Kit is about 4 times that of the Premium Mini Kit. Here are the details on the kit:

Contents of the Glo Germ Classic Kit:

  • 8 oz Glo Germ Fluorescent Gel
  • 4 oz Glo Germ Fluorescent Powder
  • Medium UV Black Light (LED)
  • Batteries 
  • Carrying case
  • Brief instructions for the Glo Germ training
Buy this Glo Germ Kit Here $71.50

Not only do you get more of the fluorescent powder and fluorescent gel, you get a larger black light and carrying case. The carrying case definitely comes in handy when you plan on using this for multiple trainings. Competing kits get lost in the shuffles of an office, but this Glo Germ Kit sticks together well.

The increased size on the LED black light helps you show more germs on the hands of participants or in the germ-simulated areas. The LED blacklight is a great enhancement from the UV black light bars that were sold in the past. Those black lights used a lot of battery life, went out relatively quick and were frequently broken. The LED last longer, shines brighter and is not as fragile as a fluorescent light bulb.

We hope that some of the information was helpful in choosing which Glo Germ Kit will work for your organization. Please contact us if you would like more assistance.

In addition, if you would like more in-depth instructions on how to use Glo Germ then please see this link [How to Use Glo Germ] or please email us [info@OUTFOXprevention.com].

Check back for other topics that populate our Hygiene Blog. We discuss industries that need more infection control, current outbreaks, success stories with fighting infection, new products, old and new technologies, healthcare trade shows and other infection related topics. 

If you would like to contribute a story, product review, success story or other top relating to health then please contact us! We would love to help further your cause or give you a voice in the health community.


Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital ...
    Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:12 AM by Todd Fox
  • Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested Learn where we need to have the best hygieneUse this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust ...
    Posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 154. View more »

Final Activity Section: Infection Control Games Part 10

posted Mar 24, 2014, 8:07 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Mar 26, 2014, 1:15 PM ]

Infection Control Games for your students!
This is the last and final round of the infection control games sections.  Please look through our blog to find the other 9 sections of hygiene activities.  Thanks for reading!  We really appreciate your efforts to OUTFOX infection and teach better hygiene habits.

Parasite Relay

Potential Supplies: Masking tape, markers, two pieces of cardboard cut into a silhouette of a simulation germ (see OUTFOX Prevention’s germ cartoons) for EACH team. 

Mark off the beginning and ending points. Divide the group into evenly numbered teams. Each team should get two germ silhouettes. These will act as their “lilies” as they try to make it from the starting line to the end point and back. The game will start on go! The team members’ goal is make it to the end point and back by only stepping on the germ silhouette. Hence, he/she places one germ silhouette down, steps, puts the next down, steps, grabs the first germ and moves it forward, steps onto the placed germs, grabs the second and moves it forward, and so forth. The first team to have all members go to the end and back wins! 

This lesson can be followed up with a Glo Germ Kit lesson.  The students will love the to see the Glo Germ on their hands and learn how to best clean up.  Use a black light to light up the fluorescent Glo materials.  Email us with questions.

Hidden Viruses (V-I-R-U-S)

Potential Supplies: Cards or construction paper (each group member should receive 5 cards or germ cutouts with a single letter on each, spelling out V-I-R-U-S. Cards can be the same color or different depending on the version or difficulty of the game desired.) 

Give a lesson on germs/ viruses that illustrate how germs are all around us but our hidden from our view. The sets of words should be mixed and spread throughout the room, hallway or building before the group meets. The object of the game is for each class member to collect 5 cards that spell out V-I-R-U-S. You can hide these in areas that normally house a lot of germs or other general areas. The first player to get virus spelled out wins. A variation of this game may include each player finding 5 cards of differing colors that also spell out V-I-R-U-S. Or another variation might entail each student finding their specific assigned color that differs from everyone else’s color. 

Evasion: Avoid the Germ

Possible Supplies: Plastic or laminated germ picture (small enough to fit into an ice cube), ice cube trays (or paper cups for bigger ice cubes), paper towels (or regular towels), etc. 

Have all the group members stand in a circle. Start the ice cube pass with the person at the top of the circle. The goal of the game is to not end up with the germ once the ice melts. No throwing, tossing, or delaying the pass. Have towels ready for their wet hands. The person that ends up with the germ loses. 

Fun Facts from NIH (www.newsinhealth.nih.gov):

Microbe laden droplets (from a cough or sneeze) can travel as far as 3 feet. 
Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue, the crook of your elbow or even your hand is the considerate thing to do. 


Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital ...
    Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:12 AM by Todd Fox
  • Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested Learn where we need to have the best hygieneUse this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust ...
    Posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 154. View more »

More Infection Control Games for Your Class Part 9

posted Mar 21, 2014, 8:00 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Mar 26, 2014, 1:13 PM ]

Search for germs or do musical viruses... both fun classic games!

Germ Scavenger Hunt 

Potential Supplies: “Scavenger Hunt Cards” 7-10 sheets of paper (colored or uncolored), markers, prizes for each group member. 

Tell the group that they will be on a hunt to find all of the germs in the room or building (or whatever area you have designated). Come up with a riddle for each area that germs often hang out. For example, hide clues in a bathroom, around a sink, on a well used doorknob, near a garbage can, near food preparation areas, locker rooms, and other places that germs hide out. Begin with a clue to the first place which then leads to the second clue, and so forth. The last area should have prizes and should be located in an area or near items that are known to kill germs (soap, wash areas, etc.). Take time each area where there is a clue to teach a lesson about how that area contains millions of germs and how to avoid catching germs and getting sick. 

Musical Viruses Hygiene Game

Potential Supplies: Construction paper, markers, stereo, scissors, etc. 

Have the group members cut out and briefly design a germ with their allotted construction paper. Have the germs placed on the ground in a circle. Have each student stand on their germ to begin. Take one away and start the music. The game is played out like musical chairs with everyone rotating around the circle. When the music stops, the players must find a germ to stand on (any germ- they do not need to return to their germ). The winner is the last player to stomp out the last germ. 

A variation of this game could consist of making different types of germs to stand on. One for boys and one for girls. The cards are again laid out in a circle. When you remove cards for each level, you must remove two- one from the girls and one from the boys. As the music ends, the boys must find their germ and the girls must find their germ as well. Those that found their germ continue to play on. Play as many rounds as needed until there is one remaining boy and one remaining girl. The remaining boy and remaining girl are the winners.

Flu Toss Infection Control Game

Potential Supplies: Water balloons, towels, volleyball net, markers, Glo Germ Kit, etc. 

This game can include all group members, but generally is played in fours or in pairs. Water balloons can be launched over a volleyball net or can be thrown without one. Dress up the water balloons with markers to look like germs. While playing in fours, two players take a towel (one corner in each hand forming a pouch) and prepare to catch the incoming water balloon! Another team takes a towel and launches the first balloon. Once the balloon is caught, the team then launches it back. The team that drops, misses, or breaks the balloon sits out. The game is played until one team remains. They survived the Flu Outbreak! When playing in pairs, the balloon is tossed between the two players. Each player takes a step back every time a balloon is caught. The player that doesn’t break a balloon wins!

Glo Germ can also be applied to the water balloons or other item you decide to play with.  This will help teach your students how germs spread and how they can avoid them in the future (good hygiene habits, handwashing, covering coughs, covering sneezes, etc.


Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital ...
    Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:12 AM by Todd Fox
  • Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested Learn where we need to have the best hygieneUse this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust ...
    Posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 154. View more »

Hot Potato with Glo Germ! Infection Control Games Part 8

posted Mar 20, 2014, 8:03 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Mar 26, 2014, 1:11 PM ]

Hot Potato is a classic game... but now you can use it teach others to not "Catch the Germ"
Hot Potato has proven to be the most effective game to teach about microbes and infection control.  It is fun because everyone avoids the germ as it is passed around!

The second reason it is an effective hygiene game is because you can use a Glo Germ Kit easily.  All you need to do is add some Glo Powder to the item that is being passed around (you can decide if you want to tell the participants whether or not you applied the "secret" invisible germs).  The item will naturally spread the infection as it is passed around.

Once the game has been played, you will then pull out the UV black light and show the students where the germs went!  There will be germs on the hands, faces, clothes, chairs, desks and so forth!  It will really illustrate how fast germs can spread.  

The simulation germs are non toxic and washable.  Have the students wash their hands and then check to see how well they did.  If you have other game ideas then please email us!  Good luck with your lesson.

Pandemic (Sardines)

Potential Supplies: No supplies necessary (can use the Glo Germ System). However, prizes are recommended to increase game interaction. 

Pandemic is played out similar to the game sardines except that it has a “germ” theme. One player is chosen to be the “antidote” of a recent pandemic and is told to hide. In order to survive, the rest of the students who are “infected” must find the antidote and stay as close as possible. The remaining players need to close their eyes and count to a predetermined number (long enough for the player hiding to find a spot). 

Once the counting is finished, all infected players set out to find the antidote. Every player that finds the antidote needs to continue to hide with all the others that have found the antidote. Be as quiet as possible! The game is played until all players are saved from the pandemic and find the antidote. The last infected person to find the group becomes the next antidote! 

Don't Catch the Germ/Cold (Hot Potato)

Potential Supplies: Ball or stuffed object, the GlitterBug Fluorescent System, prizes, etc. 

All participants are to sit or stand in a loose circle. One item should be pre-selected as the “germ” which will be tossed around. The item that is being thrown around should light, catchable, and preferably soft. A brief introduction about how colds and germs are passed around should precede the game. Mention how the “germ” chosen will represent the germs that are all around us. The players should be instructed to pass the germ as quickly as possible (to get rid of it). 

If a player has a chance to catch or touch the germ and does not end up catching it, he/she is out of the game. The germ got the best of them! Also, if a player poorly throws the germ to another player making it uncatchable, he/she is out. The last person wins!

Note: The GlitterBug System works very well with this game. Secretly apply GlitterBug lotion or powder to the germ (ball, stuffed animal, or other throwing item) before the game. Play a few rounds of “Don’t Pass the Cold” and then explain the experiment to the students. Tell them that the germ had simulated germs that glow in the dark! Turn off the classroom lights and use the black light to show how far the simulated germs traveled! This should emphasize the importance washing their hands!


Fun Facts from NIH (www.newsinhealth.nih.gov):

Bacterial chemicals called Endotoxins- in particular, on bedroom floors and in bedding- are linked to increased breathing problems in adults. 
The likelihood of recent asthma symptoms was nearly 3 times greater for people exposed to high levels of endotoxin in the bedroom.


Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital ...
    Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:12 AM by Todd Fox
  • Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested Learn where we need to have the best hygieneUse this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust ...
    Posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:19 AM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 154. View more »

1-10 of 154

Comments