Infection Control and Hygiene Blog

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Submit Form for Hand Efficiency Test

posted by Todd Fox   [ updated ]



Highly educated doctors and general hospital staff members (excluding nurses) have the lowest hand hygiene levels - that is the hypothesis. Why test this? Because we have spoken with a multitude of frustrated Infection Preventionists and nurses who want this assumption confirmed (which will help them teaching hand hygiene if so).


We will be collecting results and stats to confirm these assumptions. Can you help? to gather results you can use the Glo Germ testing system or send the results from your RFID data or other hand hygiene tracking devices. We can extract the relevant data for you. So, either email results to info@OUTFOXprevention.com or use the form below.


Submit data here:




If using the Glo Germ testing method, you can download a printable (PDF) handwashing test sheet that can be used to score and send results home with the employee (as a reminder of hand hygiene).

Download here >



Free Hand Washing Test Sheet (PDF)

posted Apr 25, 2015, 10:17 PM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 25, 2015, 10:26 PM ]


Use this Hand Washing Sheet to teach and test proper hand hygiene. Glo Germ is used to teach techniques while the attached PDF is used track where the student is struggling with their handwashing. Mark up the hands to be able to give them a percentage of hand hygiene efficiency. Make sure to check and mark the front and back of the hands. 

The Glo Germ simulation germs SHOW students the germs. The fluorescent gel germs glow under the UV black light. 

Please see the free PDF download of the Hand Washing Test Sheet at the bottom of this page. The following is the example sheet:


How clean is your workspace? Glo Germ can show you.

posted Apr 24, 2015, 7:52 PM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 24, 2015, 7:53 PM ]


Created by:
The Cleaning Services Group
www.thecleaningservicesgroup.co.uk
www.cleaningservicesgroup.co.uk

Creating Excellent Employee Participation in Infection Control

posted Apr 16, 2015, 8:22 PM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 16, 2015, 8:24 PM ]

Make hygiene and infection control initiatives engaging with Glo Germ

 Glo Germ Health Lesson

Glo Germ Lesson: Student/Faculty Excellence

Employee Excellence with Infection Control


 

Content Objective:

Faculty members and/or students will help create and maintain an atmosphere of excitement and competition for all hygiene and infection control activities. 

Faculty members and/or students will develop a desire to continually go above and beyond the hygiene and infection control requirements for their respective roles or positions (at home or school).

Materials:

Criteria list for model behavior, Glo Germ, educational and promotional posters, prizes and awards for incentives, OUTFOX Newsletter (to pass on to fellow faculty members, family members, friends, etc.), Certificates of Achievement (for all participants), various games and activities for periodic competitions (see “Games” and “Activities” sections), Daily Schedule for Health Week (or for the amount of days planned), reminder handouts, magnets, stickers, and other reminders.

Vocabulary

  • Excellence
  • Standard
  • Hygiene

Building Background Knowledge:

Ask students the following questions:

  • What are the minimum hygiene standards for the class or school?
  • What standards need to be added or revisited to increase the level of cleanliness in the class or school?
  • How does hygiene create a better classroom atmosphere?
  • How can better hygiene affect a person?

Exploration:

 

  • Determine what types of games, activities and prizes are the most fun and sought after.
  • Use the Glo Germ Kit to illustrate how germs spread and affect us daily.
    • Have students apply the Glo Germ Lotion or Powder.  Make sure they get it all over their hands (i.e. doorknobs, sinks, pencils, or other designated area)
    • Using the black light, show students how germs lurk on their hands
    • Have them wash their hands and check for the germs again
    • Use the Identifier Lotion or Powder for many of the activities and games supplied by OUTFOX in this manual

Explanation:

 

First of all, this lesson can be used to teach a single classroom, a grade group or a faculty group.  The class or faculty members can be split into teams or they can play as individuals. 

Well in-advance reminders should be placed in the classroom or school to get participants excited for the competition.  Reminders can include educational and promotional posters, reminder cards, take-home instructions, prize displays, and so forth.  Reminders should continue to be used once the “competition” has started to maintain visibility and a remembrance in the minds of faculty/students. 

The object of the Excellence activity is to gain points or “BLING Bucks” to buy prizes in the award store.  Points or bucks can be earned by being noticed practicing good hygiene habits (washing hands, cleaning up workstations or desks, using a tissue, etc.), completing specific tasks, or by winning planned games/activities.

Once the standards or criteria of effective hygiene and infection control have been established, let the faculty or students know how they will be scored (how many points will be given or how many BLING Bucks will be handed out).  You can maintain a running tally of points given and award teams accordingly. 

If using a points system, help students maintain focus and control during all the activities and competitions by continually updating scores or team progress.  At the finale of the day, week, or other time frame of the competition, recognize the leaders and emphasize how the losing teams can earn more points or bucks.  Set a deadline for the competition so that all points or bucks accrued can be turned in for prizes and encourage positive results.

Store items can include:  germ-themed pencils, T-shirts, school supplies, treats, etc.

“Hands On Experience:”

 

  • Illustrate the importance of hygiene with the Glo Germ Kit
  • Show how good behavior is rewarded with points or bucks
  • Positive reinforcement takes place when points or bucks can be redeemed for items that the faculty members or students would like to have
  • The competitive environment will increase the excitement level for  the students

Wrap Up:

 

  • If the lesson and competition time period proves to be successful, announce that it will continue for a certain amount of time further.
  • Talk about social norms and how students many not be rewarded with points or bucks in the normal world when they demonstrate effective hygiene principles, but students can enjoy benefits of acting responsibly.

Home Connection:

 

  • Have the students color and design their own “BLING Bucks” to take home and use with family members and friends
  • Have them share the same list of hygiene standards with at least one other person at home.


Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:



Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Submit Form for Hand Efficiency Test Highly educated doctors and general hospital staff members (excluding nurses) have the lowest hand hygiene levels - that is the hypothesis. Why test this? Because we have spoken with a multitude ...
    Posted by Todd Fox
  • Free Hand Washing Test Sheet (PDF) Use this Hand Washing Sheet to teach and test proper hand hygiene. Glo Germ is used to teach techniques while the attached PDF is used track where the student is ...
    Posted Apr 25, 2015, 10:26 PM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 162. View more »


Infection Control Bingo Game Activity

posted Apr 1, 2015, 10:35 PM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 1, 2015, 11:06 PM ]

Have some fun with hygiene and infection control by playing Bingo!

Glo Germ Health Lesson

Glo Germ Lesson: Clean! (Bingo)

Clean! (Bingo)

 

 

Content Objective:


   The students will learn the terms associated with infection control and hygiene through a fun game CLEAN! (Bingo). The students will develop a higher awareness of good hygiene principles by engaging in a fun game that teaches about a subject often deemed as taboo.  

Use the free PDF download at the bottom of this page for game pieces.
 

Materials:


  • CLEAN! (Bingo) player cards (included)
  • CLEAN! Call Out Pieces (included), 
  • place markers (at least 20 per person- small candies or beans work best), Bingo set (optional for older groups or longer play), 
  • printed labels to tape or paste over “Bingo” (needed only if opting to use an official Bingo set), 
  • scissors, 
  • prizes (germ-themed are the best), 
  • Certificates of Achievement

Vocabulary

  • H1N1 
  • Bacteria 
  • Prevention

Building Background Knowledge:


Ask students the following questions: 

  • How can we win the battle of good health? 
    • Washing up, keeping a clean environment, using soap, etc. 
  • What does it mean to be CLEAN? 
  • How can playing games help us remember certain topics? 
    • You remember fun experiences more often 
    • You associate the principles to a fun time

Exploration:

 


  • Expose the available germ-themed prizes (reminder pencils, erasers, etc.) 
  • Use the germBLING™ System to illustrate how germs spread and affect us daily. 
    • Have students apply the germBLING™ Identifier Lotion or Powder. Make sure they get it all over their hands (i.e. doorknobs, sinks, pencils, or other designated area) 
    • Using the black light, show students how germs lurk on their hands 
    • Have them wash their hands and check for the germs again 
    • Use the Identifier Lotion or Powder for many of the activities and games supplied by OUTFOX in this manual

Explanation:

 


There are 30 unique Player Game Cards provided. Depending on your class size, you will need to run additional copies for more than 30 players. This means that you will potentially have 2 winners if you have over 30 players or boards in any one game. 

Introduce the terms found on the CLEAN! Player Cards. Have a short discussion about each word. Provide examples at appropriate times. This is a good time in the lesson to perform the germBLING™ activity. 

Once the students return to their areas from the germBLING™ activity, explain the rules of the game. Specifically, one place marker should be used on each square that is called out. The entire board game is fair game (and not limited to columns) for called out squares. 

For example, if the “Health” square is called out, a player should mark the “Health” square regardless of whether it is under column “C” or any other column. Since each player has every term on their Game Card, a game of “Blackout” would result in everyone winning. The center “CLEAN!” square is a free square that all students can mark at the beginning. 

You can play many versions of CLEAN!. For example, first player with 5 in a row wins, first player to get 2 rows or columns completed wins, first player to get a cross on the board wins, etc. 

Play until you do not have prizes left or until the game has met your objectives.

“Hands On Experience:”

 

  • Have the students cut out and decorate their own Game Cards 
  • Conduct the germBLING™ System activity 
  • Allow the winning player to pick and call out the terms for the next round of CLEAN!

Wrap Up:

 

  • After CLEAN!, run through the words one more time and ask if there was any insight gained from associating the terms in a game 
  • Hand out Certificates of Achievement that indicates that they participated in the hygiene lesson

Home Connection:

 

  • Let each student take his/her personally designed Game Card home to hang on their wall or refrigerator 
  • If appropriate and desired, make copies of the Game Cards and Call Out Pieces for the game CLEAN! To be played at home with family members and friends

 



Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Submit Form for Hand Efficiency Test Highly educated doctors and general hospital staff members (excluding nurses) have the lowest hand hygiene levels - that is the hypothesis. Why test this? Because we have spoken with a multitude ...
    Posted by Todd Fox
  • Free Hand Washing Test Sheet (PDF) Use this Hand Washing Sheet to teach and test proper hand hygiene. Glo Germ is used to teach techniques while the attached PDF is used track where the student is ...
    Posted Apr 25, 2015, 10:26 PM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 162. View more »


Infographic: The places germs lurk the most at school

posted Sep 12, 2014, 2:27 PM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 1, 2015, 10:53 PM ]


Download the infographic image or use the stats contained within this post!  There are germs everywhere but you can do your body a favor and avoid the places with a large concentration of bacteria.  Now that the surfaces with a lot of germs have been identified, you can use Glo Germ to show students, employees, and so forth how to clean or wash surfaces/hands.  Here is the germ stats extracted from the infection control infographic:

The places germs lurk the most at school

The different school surfaces were judged and measured in colony forming units per square inch (CFU/square inch).
  • Water fountain spigot in a classroom- 2,700,000 CFU/in sq
  • Water fountain spigot in a cafeteria- 62,000 CFU/in sq
  • Plastic reusable cafeteria tray- 33,800 CFU/in sq
  • Faucet handle for cold water- 32,000 CFU/in sq
  • Faucet handle for hot water- 18,000 CFU/in sq
  • Cafeteria plate- 15,800 CFU/in sq
  • Keyboard in a classroom- 3,300 CFU/in sq
  • Student's hand- 1,200 CFU/in sq
  • Toilet seat- 3,200 CFU/in sq
  • Classroom animal cage- 1,200 CFU/in sq
Help keep germs at bay by washing your hands properly.  Always use warm water and soap.  Scrub for at least 20 seconds.

Glo Germ and handwashing

Glo Germ is fluorescent gel or fluorescent powder used to simulate germs.  You can put the Glogerm on hands, desks, nurse stations, etc. to show how germs spread.  Simulation germs are also very effective for food safety and healthcare infection control.

Info graphic compiled by University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC Urgent Care: source www.nsf.org)



The Scary Truth About the Surfaces Around Us - Infographic

posted Jul 14, 2014, 9:13 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 1, 2015, 10:55 PM ]


The Scary Truth About the Dirtiest Surfaces You Touch Every Day Infographic

The following information is illustrated on the inforgraphic about germs, bacteria and other harmful materials we encounter every day.  Please feel free to download and distribute.
  • Your money contains 135,000 types of bacteria per dollar bill
  • You mobile phone contains as much as a petri dish of 10,000+ germs
  • Your bathtub contains bacteria found near the drain which can cause staph infections, urinary tract infections, pneumonia and septicemia
  • Your TV remote easily transfers the MRSA, VRE and SARS bacteria when you touch it
  • Your computer keyboard could have more bacteria than an average toilet
  • Your shopping cart can have more bacteria, saliva, and fecal matter than escalators, public telephones and public bathrooms
  • Your toilet seat can contain on average 295 bacteria per square inch
  • Your light switches can contain on average 217 bacteria per square inch

Of the home testing sites, which areas contained the most potential fecal contamination (out of dish sponges, kitchen sinks, counter tops, chopping boards, tooth brush holders)?
  • 3 out of 4 dish sponges were contaminated with potential fecal matter (bacteria)
  • 1 out of 2 kitchen sinks had bacteria (Coliform- group bacteria includes Salmonella and E. coli)
  • 1 in every 3 counter tops tested for potential fecal contamination
  • 1 in every 5 chopping boards had the potential for contamination
  • More than 1 in every 4 tooth brush holders contained traces of potential fecal matter

Which area is the dirtiest?  Bathroom?  Kitchen?
  • The bathroom (most think so)?  No, the kitchen!

Which area is the dirtiest?  Toothbrush holder?  Dish Sponge?
  • Most think that toothbrush holders due to them being in our mouths, but in reality it is the dish sponge!
This about how a Glo Germ Kit training could help change the mindset and responsibility of people.  Their homes would be cleaner and they would spread less illness and disease!

Germs in your work place.  What areas contain the highest area of germ content?
  • 3 in every 4 break room sink faucet handles contain ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate- a molecule present in all animal, vegetable, bacterial, tease and mound cells.  High levels are detrimental to human health)
  • Almost 1 in every 2 microwave door handles are contaminated
  • More than 1 in every 4 computer keyboards are contaminated
  • More than 1 in every 4 refrigerator door handles contains high levels of ATP
  • More than 1 in every 5 water fountain buttons can be contaminated 
  • More than 1 in every 5 vending machine buttons can contain levels of ATP that are a detriment to your health

What are the germ hotspots in your office or workplace?
  • Elevator buttons
  • Stair railings
  • Conference tables
  • Door handles
  • Photocopiers
  • Water coolers
  • Reception areas (magazines, pens, etc.)
  • Lobby area

What can you to reduce the spread of germs?  General germ facts.
  • Rinsing and drying your hands completely with a paper towel reduces 77% of bacteria
  • A virus on a person's hands can transfer germs to hard surfaces up to 7 times
  • Larger groups of people have the potential to spread germs even further
  • Germs can live on hard surfaces for up to 48 hours
  • Adults touch their faces 15.7 times per hour on average transmitting germs to surfaces they touch
  • Viruses can live up to 2 hours on surfaces
  • Viruses can be transferred between people up to 6 times
  • Hard surfaces should be wiped daily

Information and info graphic were provided by http://www.dustboxcleaning.co.uk/



New Glo Germ Mini Kit Product Review

posted May 13, 2014, 8:16 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 1, 2015, 10:55 PM ]

The Glo Germ Mini Kit is the easiest entry into the world of fluorescent trainings. The 2 oz fluorescent gel will be enough to get you started and testing germ simulations. 

We have discussed the Glo Germ Premium Mini Kits and Classic Kits, but they still may not be right for your organization or situation. Some of you may still be hesitant about the impact that Glo Germ can have on your organization or individual processes.


Spending a larger amount of budget on an unproven kit seems like a risky move… and we agree. That is why the Mini Kit is a great way to try out the benefits of Glo Germ without spending a large amount.

The Glo Germ Mini Kit can still do everything that larger kits can do, but it does it in smaller quantities.

For example, here are some great uses for Glo Germ:

  • Hand washing trainings
  • Orientations for new employees or students
  • Germ spreading lessons and demonstrations
  • Hand shaking demonstration
  • Coughing effects
  • Proper glove removal (if applicable)
  • Proper gown removal (if applicable)
  • Blood simulations
  • Cleaning competitions
  • Cleaning trainings
  • Inspections
  • Quality assurance verifications

The contents of the Glo Germ Mini Kit include:

  • 2 oz. Glo Germ Fluorescent Gel
  • Small UV LED black light (keychain)
  • Brief Glo Germ instructions
  • Bag carrying case

So, the capability of the smaller kit is the same, but you won’t get as much Glo Germ Gel and the illumination will be quite a bit less than the larger black light flashlights.

You may have to isolate the area you would like to illuminate (hands, equipment, etc.) in a darker place, but the effect is the same. If you plan to show the effects of not hand washing in normal light, then we recommend thinking about getting a larger kit. The Premium Mini Kit isn’t too big of a step up to get 10x the light and double the Glo Germ.

We estimate that the 2 oz. bottle of Glo Gel will last about 30-50 applications on hands and 100-150 equipment swabs (depending on the amount applied). If you are looking for more than that then we suggest looking into the other kits that have a 8 oz. Glo Gel bottle AND a 4 oz. Glo Powder bottle (fluorescent powder is not included in the Mini Kit).

If you are still unsure about the size of Glo Germ Kit that you will need for your organization, program or classroom then please contact us. We can discuss with you the available options and give some insight.

Please also contact us if you would like ideas on how to best use Glo Germ in your organization. We have success stories and a good idea of what works best for every type of industry.

Thank your for reading! We hope that you can also see the amazing benefits of implementing a Glo Germ Kit Training into your organization or program!



Infection Control Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Submit Form for Hand Efficiency Test Highly educated doctors and general hospital staff members (excluding nurses) have the lowest hand hygiene levels - that is the hypothesis. Why test this? Because we have spoken with a multitude ...
    Posted by Todd Fox
  • Free Hand Washing Test Sheet (PDF) Use this Hand Washing Sheet to teach and test proper hand hygiene. Glo Germ is used to teach techniques while the attached PDF is used track where the student is ...
    Posted Apr 25, 2015, 10:26 PM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 162. View more »

Action Needed to Combat Hospital Infections

posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:11 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 1, 2015, 10:56 PM ]

Reports recently released in both the United States and Canada reveal that far more needs to be done in the hospitals of both countries to limit patient exposure to hospital acquired infections (HAIs).

In Canada, where approximately 220,000 Canadians (or approximately 0.6% of the population) are infected with an HAI annually, a new survey revealed that a startling number (38%) of hospital infection control experts believe their hospitals are not clean enough to prevent the spread of infectious organisms like C. difficile. The survey was conducted in late 2012 and early 2013, and comprised the infection control experts of 113 hospitals across Canada.

C. difficile, the bacteria and spores of which are found in feces, can be picked up by coming into contact with contaminated surfaces, objects, or other people, and is potentially fatal. It accounts for more than half of the offending infections in Canadian hospitals, and the death rate from C. difficile has tripled in Canada over the past 15 years.

As hygiene of hospital staff is paramount to preventing the spread of the bacteria to patients, hand-washing campaigns have been initiated that have been successful in improving the rate of hand hygiene amongst Canadian health care practitioners from a lowly 30% into the 80-90% range.

U.S Numbers Just as Bleak

In the U.S, the numbers are just as stark. Approximately 4% of patients pick up a HAI during their hospital stays according to the CDC, which is up from their previous estimates. 200 of those infected patients will end up dying from their infection annually, while 75,000 patients will die in U.S hospitals annually with a HAI (without it being the primary cause of death).

Pneumonia accounted for the most common infection type, along with surgical site infections, with 157,500 of each case. C. difficile was the most common bacteria leading to infections. Other bacteria included Klebsiella, E. coli, Enterococcus, andPseudomonasThe former two, part of the Enterobacteriaceae family of bacteria, are becoming resistant to last-resort antibiotics according to the CDC.

Antibiotic Overuse Partially to Blame for Infections?

One prominent characteristic of C. difficile is that an infection is more likely to take control when a patient is on antibiotics. As antibiotics alter (and often temporarily destroy) the gut bacteria of those taking them, it allows C. difficile to take root in the gut and flourish. It’s not surprising then that the Public Health Agency of Canada recommends not only diligent hand-washing and hygiene, but also careful use of antibiotics to limit the number of patients that could be threatened by C. difficile.

As the CDC reported in early March, antibiotic overuse is not only putting patients at risk of contracting infections like C. difficile, it’s also leading to less and less effectiveness from the drugs themselves, and further fuelling the creation of drug resistant superbugs.

What Patients Can Do to Help

Hygiene amongst patients is just as important as for the medical professionals themselves, and patients should avoid touching objects and surfaces in their rooms and around the hospital as much as possible, while keeping their hands clean whenever they can. Patients should be as proactive regarding their health and well-being as they can be, factoring in their given condition at the time.

Patients are also encouraged to ask their doctors or nurses if they’ve washed their hands, with some U.S hospitals posting signs saying “It’s OK to ask”. Whether their stay is at a hospital, a long term care facility, an intensive care unit, or a rehab center, patients need to have complete faith in their health care provider, as they are often  putting their lives in their hands. Hand hygiene is particularly important in the ICU, where patients have weakened and vulnerable immune systems that are susceptible to infection. In long term care facilities and rehab centers for addiction and physical rehabilitation where patients are often staying for extended periods of time, added emphasis needs to be placed on cleaning and disinfecting one's sleeping quarters to remove bacteria, allowing those patients to focus on their recovery with confidence.

"It's Ok to Ask"

A study conducted in Canada last summer also showed that doctors were more cognizant of washing their hands when they knew patients were watching them, which could give hospitals incentive to make hand-washing stations more readily available in patient rooms.

Other advancements are also being worked on that could further improve hand hygiene among health care workers. One promising field is wearable tech, with devices that could be used to alert practitioners to when they should be washing their hands and how well they've done so. Hyginex, a company in the hand hygiene technology field recently received an investment from Persistent Systems to help them launch their devices, which would monitor hand rub duration and frequency, among other factors.



Infection Control Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Submit Form for Hand Efficiency Test Highly educated doctors and general hospital staff members (excluding nurses) have the lowest hand hygiene levels - that is the hypothesis. Why test this? Because we have spoken with a multitude ...
    Posted by Todd Fox
  • Free Hand Washing Test Sheet (PDF) Use this Hand Washing Sheet to teach and test proper hand hygiene. Glo Germ is used to teach techniques while the attached PDF is used track where the student is ...
    Posted Apr 25, 2015, 10:26 PM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 162. View more »


Health Week Lesson Plan Day 5: Germ Infested

posted Apr 4, 2014, 8:16 AM by Todd Fox   [ updated Apr 1, 2015, 10:57 PM ]

Learn where we need to have the best hygiene
Use this lesson to teach handwashing and other hygiene principles to kindergarten students through 5th grade (K-5). You can adjust the concepts and principles to have it apply to older students, nurses, healthcare workers, restaurant employees and others that work in areas with health issues (germ spreading, bacteria, foodborne illnesses, etc.). 


This lesson is typically conducted in conjunction with other infection control lessons throughout the National Public Health Week.  Contact us if you would like other ways to celebrate health week or to teach about microbes and preventing infection.  

Make sure to download the free worksheets so that your students can have a productive activity to go along with the health lesson.

We hope that health week goes well for you and that your students or employees learn better health habits!

Glo Germ Health Week


Glo Germ Day 5

Where Are Germs at Home and on My Body?


 

Content Objective:

Students will be able to recognize places where germs may hide at home and be able to teach their families the importance of hand-washing.

Materials:

Germ Journal “Germs At Home Too?” page (PDF attached), Pictures of home places (sinks, counter tops, toilets, etc.), Glo Germ Kit (fluorescent lotion and UV black light)

Vocabulary:

·       Sanitation

Building Background Knowledge:

Ask students the following questions:

  • We’ve learned a lot about germs in school, but where are places that germs can hide at your home?
  • Where else can germs hide on your body?

Exploration:

 

  • Have students review places that germs can hide in the classroom. Write a list on the chalkboard or whiteboard.
  • Remind students that germs like to hide in places that are dirty and that people touch a lot.
  • Show students pictures of places around the home. Ask them why germs could be hiding there. (they are dirty and get touched a lot)
  • Use the Glo Germ system to teach hand washing.  The fluorescent lotion is applied, checked with the black light, the student washes their hands, and the hands are again checked with the UV blacklight.

Explanation:

 

  • Remind students that there are other places on their bodies that germs can hide.  Germs called “plaque” can live in your teeth and make holes in your teeth. Germs called “lice” can live in your hair. Different germs can live in all different parts of their bodies.
  • Explain to students that they need to keep all parts of their body clean. They don’t need to wash their bodies as much as they wash their hands, but they need to keep all parts of their bodies clean.
  • Ask students when they need to wash their hands. (after using the restroom, after coughing or sneezing, before eating, etc.)
  • Ask students when they need to brush their teeth. (2 times a day or after eating)
  • Ask students when they need to wash their bodies. (every day or after they go somewhere with lots of germs.)

“Hands On Experience”:

 

  • Finish the last 2 pages together with your class comparing and contrasting where germs are at home and school. The center section should have listed things such as doorknobs, sinks, bathrooms and so forth. Germs at School should have things that students touch at school like pencils, drinking fountains, etc. Germs at Home should have things like TV remotes, utensils, etc.

Wrap Up:

  • Remind students that germs are everywhere and they need to be in charge of getting germs off of them!

Home Connection:

  • Ask students to share with their parents what they learned about germs.

 

 

 



Individual Products:

Product Quick Links:


OUTFOX Mindset Items:

Recent Infection Control Blog Posts

  • Submit Form for Hand Efficiency Test Highly educated doctors and general hospital staff members (excluding nurses) have the lowest hand hygiene levels - that is the hypothesis. Why test this? Because we have spoken with a multitude ...
    Posted by Todd Fox
  • Free Hand Washing Test Sheet (PDF) Use this Hand Washing Sheet to teach and test proper hand hygiene. Glo Germ is used to teach techniques while the attached PDF is used track where the student is ...
    Posted Apr 25, 2015, 10:26 PM by Todd Fox
Showing posts 1 - 2 of 162. View more »


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